Asia Pacific Trade Agreement Rules

APTA preferences may overlap with separate DFQF systems from China, India and the Republic of Korea, as well as preferences under the SAFTA, ASEAN-China, ASEAN-India and ASEAN-Republic of Korea regional trade agreements. Products imported into the territory of a participating state under the agreement and shipped directly within the meaning of Rule 6 may benefit from preferential concessions if they meet the original requirement under one of the following conditions: (c) the shipping conditions set out in the rules of origin of the Asia-Pacific trade agreement. As a general rule, products must be shipped directly from the export country to the destination country under Rule 6. (ii) products are not marketed or consumed; and APTA recognises the specific needs of the least developed countries and calls for concrete preference measures in their favour (Article 3). Participating states can grant special concessions to least developed countries (Article 7) and commit to paying particular attention to NDC requests for technical assistance. In practice, most members have made special concessions to LDCs in successive rounds of trade liberalization (see here lists of concessions for the fourth round). The fourth round of negotiations will focus on areas that go beyond traditional tariff concessions in order to deepen trade policy cooperation and integration. APTA members are currently negotiating three framework agreements on trade facilitation, trade in services and investment. In addition, APTA members exchange information on non-tariff measures. The Asia-Pacific Trade Agreement (APTA), formerly known as the Bangkok Agreement[1] and renamed on November 2, 2005,[2] was signed in 1975. It is the oldest preferential trade agreement between countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Seven participating states – Bangladesh, China, India, Lao PDR, Mongolia, Republic of Korea and Sri Lanka – are parties to APTA. The APTA pact occupies the market for 2921.2 million people [2] and the size of this large market represents $14615.86 billion in gross domestic product (GDP) in the 2015-16 fiscal year. [3] APTA`s main objective is to accelerate economic development among the seven participating states that opt for trade and investment liberalization measures that, through the coverage of goods and services, synchronized investment and the free transfer of technology, will contribute to the coverage of intra-regional trade and economic strengthening. Its aim is to promote economic development and cooperation through trade liberalization measures.